29th Annual Symposium of the Friends of the GHI

May 14, 2021  | 10am - 2pm ET

Award of the 2020 & 2021 Fritz Stern Dissertation Prize at the GHI | Prize Winners: Emma Thomas (PhD., University of Michigan, 2019) and Richard Calis (PhD., Princeton University, 2020)

The 29th Annual Symposium of the Friends of the GHI will feature lectures from the 2020 and 2021 Fritz Stern Dissertation Prize winners. The prizes are kindly sponsored by the Friends of the German Historical Institute. Please register for the lectures individually.
 

“'Contact' Embodied: German Colonialism, New Guinean Women, and the Everyday Exploitation of a Labor Force"

Register here, 10:00am (ET)

The 2020 Fritz Stern prize lecture will be delivered by Emma Thomas for her dissertation, “Contested Labors: New Guinean Women and the German Colonial Indenture, 1884-1914" (PhD. Dissertation, University of Michigan, 2019)

"Martin Crusius (1526-1607) and the Lutheran Discovery of Ottoman Greece"

Register here, 12:00pm (ET)

The 2021 Fritz Stern prize lecture will be delivered by Richard Calis for his dissertation, "Martin Crusius (1526-1607) and the Lutheran Discovery of Ottoman Greece" (PhD. Dissertation, Princeton University, 2020). 

About the lectures


“'Contact' Embodied: German Colonialism, New Guinean Women, and the Everyday Exploitation of a Labor Force," by Emma Thomas, Ph.D.

This talks explores the histories of indigenous women and their participation in the indentured labor force that formed the foundation of German colonial rule in New Guinea (1884-1914). Drawing on an archive that includes imperial ordinances, European travel writings, photographs, and colonial court records, this talk reveals the significance of women’s labors to Germany’s colonial project, and the myriad exploitations that accompanied it. Homing in on embodied sites of colonial “contact,” it demonstrates how New Guinean women negotiated European claims to their laboring, racialized, and often eroticized bodies, and confronted German efforts to align local understandings of gender, sexuality, family, and labor with imperial concerns.
 

"Martin Crusius (1526-1607) and the Lutheran Discovery of Ottoman Greece" by Richard Calis, Ph.D.

From the comfort of his Tübingen home, and in ways that were both innovative and conventional, a Lutheran professor of Greek by the name of Martin Crusius (1526-1607) compiled the early modern period’s richest record of Greek life under Ottoman rule. Through analyses of an extraordinary well-preserved set of sources—hundreds of Crusius’s books and manuscripts have survived in Tübingen—my talk reconstructs the particular confluence of historical circumstances that allowed Crusius to become the period’s foremost expert on Ottoman Greece. I show how religion furthered ethnography and how unknown forms of Mediterranean mobility turned a deeply gendered professorial home into a site of trans-national and cross-cultural encounter, bookish, social, and otherwise. Telling Crusius’s remarkable story thus reveals how three fields of inquiry now often studied separately—the Lutheran Reformation, the history of the early modern Mediterranean, and the history of cultural encounter—were once a single arena of experience and investigation.