Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German-Japanese Relations, 1919–1936

Based on the Ricky Law’s Fritz Stern Prize-winning dissertation, this study of interwar German-Japanese relations is the first to employ sources in both languages to survey the two national media environments and to examine the impact of transnational Nazism. Because of the distance between Germany and Japan, mass media was instrumental in shaping mutual perceptions and spreading transnational Nazism. When Hitler and the Nazi movement gained prominence, Japanese newspapers, lectures and pamphlets, nonfiction, and language textbooks transformed to promote the man and his party. Likewise, the ascendancy of Hitler and his regime created a niche for Japan in the Nazi worldview and Nazified newspapers, films, nonfiction, and voluntary associations. This book demonstrates how transnational Nazism was an ideological and cultural outlook that attracted non-Germans to become adherents of Hitler and National Socialism, and convinced German Nazis to identify with certain non-Aryans. 

Transnational Nazism: Ideology and Culture in German-Japanese Relations, 1919–1936 by Ricky W. Law is available from Cambridge University Press in the “Publications of the German Historical Institute” series.