Workshop on Early Modern German History

This workshop has been taking place at the GHI London since 2002 and has established itself as the principal forum for cross-disciplinary discussion of new research on early modern German-speaking Central Europe. Co-sponsored by the German History Society (UK) and the German Historical Institutes in London and Washington, the workshop switched to a biennial schedule in 2016. The next workshop will thus take place in the spring of 2018. 

The workshop provides the opportunity to discuss work-in-progress as well as theoretical and methodological approaches. Previous themes have included artistic and literary representations, medicine and musicology, as well as political, social, economic and religious history. Contributions are also welcome from those wishing to range outside the period generally considered as ‘early modern' and those engaged in comparative research on other parts of early modern Europe.

The meeting is organized as a series of themed panels, each introduced by a panel chair and consisting of two to three short papers followed by discussion. The point of the papers is to present new findings or work-in-progress in summary form, rather than extended detailed discussion. Accordingly, participants are encouraged to keep to 15 minutes, highlight major findings or questions, and indicate how work might develop in the future.

Calls for Papers will be posted here every other fall for the workshop taking place the following spring. Doctoral students from North America (USA and Canada) who wish to present at the workshop can apply for two travel funding grants provided by the GHI Washington. Please indicate your interest in this grant in your application. The CFP for the 2018 Workshop will be posted here in the fall of 2017. For the report of the last workshop, click below:

Thirteenth Workshop on Early Modern German History

May 06, 2016
Conference at the GHI London
Conveners: Bridget Heal (University of St Andrews), David Lederer (National University of Ireland, Maynooth), Michael Schaich (German Historical Institute London), Jenny Spinks (University of Manchester)