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Dr. Mario Daniels

Research Fellow
German Historical Institute
1607 New Hampshire Ave NW
Washington DC 20009
U.S.A.
Phone +1.202.387.3355

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Biographical Summary
Mario Daniels is Fellow in Economic and Social History at the GHI. He studied Modern History, Modern German Literature, and Political Science at the University of Hamburg and University of Tübingen, where he also received his Ph.D. in 2007. He is the author of Geschichtswissenschaft im 20. Jahrhundert: Institutionalisierungsprozesse und Entwicklung des Personenverbandes an der Universität Tübingen 1918-1964 (Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 2009). In 2007 he took up a position as Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter for German and European Contemporary History at the University of Hannover. His current research project deals with industrial espionage in Germany and the U.S. in the Twentieth Century.

Main Areas of Interest
  • Economic and Social History
  • Business History
  • History of Science
  • History of Technology
  • Genocide Research

GHI Research Project
  • "Economic and Industrial Espionage in Germany, the U.S. and Great Britain 1880-1990"

    Industrial espionage is a subject that, though often discussed in the media, so far has been treated only rarely by historians. My research project would like to close some of the obvious research gaps with a century-long comparison of Germany and the United States in order to identify contrasts, long-term changes and constants. The project discusses the importance of economic espionage for corporations and their countermeasures to protect themselves against illegal knowledge transfer. Since the late 19th century, a technological "lead" has increasingly been regarded as one of the factors responsible for an uneven distribution of market and political opportunities of states in a global competition. Governments and corporations therefore cooperated closely in the area of a "knowledge policy," which included espionage by national intelligence agencies in favor of the national economy as well as concerted safety precautions by state and corporations against industrial espionage. This trend becomes understandable only if it is connected to the discourses that shaped it. The semantics employed in connection with industrial espionage radiate primarily from the questions of what role technological knowledge plays in the development of industrialized societies, whether and how it is shaped nationally, and why it has to be part of concepts of national security.

Publications
  • Geschichtswissenschaft im 20. Jahrhundert: Institutionalisierungsprozesse und Entwicklung des Personenverbandes an der Universität Tübingen 1918-1964 (Contubernium, v. 71). Stuttgart, 2009.
  • "Strukturwandel unter ideologischen Vorzeichen. Wissenschafts- und Personalpolitik an der Universität Tübingen 1933-1945" (with Susanne Michl), in: Urban Wiesing/Klaus-Rainer Brintzinger/Bernd Grün/Horst Junginger/Susanne Michl (eds.): Die Universität Tübingen im Nationalsozialismus. Stuttgart, 2010, p. 13-73.
  • "Auslandskunde an der Universität Tübingen 1918-1945," in: Urban Wiesing/Klaus-Rainer Brintzinger/Bernd Grün/Horst Junginger/Susanne Michl (eds.): Die Universität Tübingen im Nationalsozialismus (Contubernium, v. 73), Stuttgart, 2010, p. 351-384.